US Women & PrEP: Remember Us?

The New York Times recently ran an article about the use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) as the next great sexual revolution – it compared the impact that the pill made for women to the impact that PrEP can make for men who have sex with men (MSM).

statistics_incidence_graph_550x345
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/statistics/surveillance/incidence/

We certainly cannot ignore the high rates of new infections among MSM.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2010 63% of new infections are among men who have sex with men. But that statistic, as alarming as it may be, does not mean that we should ignore other vulnerable populations.

On May 14, 2014, the CDC came out with new guidelines for providers on assessing risk and prescribing PrEP. And those guidelines focused on all vulnerable populations – including women.  Though it’s important that we see PrEP for what it is – and the positive outcomes that it will support – as an important step forward in HIV prevention and treatment, that step is not exclusive to men.

Let’s remember that the HIV epidemic is diverse and focus on the ways that our prevention and treatment efforts can reach all vulnerable populations.  We need to decrease stigma associated with PrEP and ensure that providers increase access to PrEP for both men and women.  We need to ensure that there is an effective outreach strategy in place to reach both men and women who are at risk of HIV infection.

TWC calls on public and private entities involved in guideline development and dissemination to work with obstetricians, gynecologists, and thought leaders in women’s health to ensure increasing voluntary and informed discussion of PrEP by providers and use of PrEP by vulnerable populations. We also strongly recommend collaboration between guideline-making bodies and community-based women’s organizations, both within and beyond the HIV arena, the U.S. Women and PrEP Working Group, AVAC, and a diverse group of HIV stakeholders to ensure that guidelines are practical and inclusive of all populations, including women and people of color.

What are your thoughts on PrEP outreach and roll-out? How can we further ensure that women have access to PrEP?

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